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Showing 33–48 of 176 results

  • ChabrierPaysageRecPtInC

    2 pp.
    $0.50
  • 1st Mvmt.

    Originally in d minor, transposed here to g.

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • 3rd mvmt.

    Originally in c minor, transposed here to g. Revised Dec. 12, 2016.

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • F minor version

    Originally in c# minor, transposed here to g.

    2 pp.
    $0.50
  • -2

    2 pp.
    $0.50
  • TEST123TEsT

    2 pp.
    $1.00
  • Chorus “Was Gott thut das ist wohlgethan” from Cantata 99/100

    This arrangement is based on a chorus which in similar form opens both Cantata 99 and 100. It is for full Baroque orchestra plus four-part chorus. The title, the same in both cases, means “What God does, that is rightly done.” The original key in both cases is G major, transposed here to C.

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • 1st Mvmt.

    Originally in F major, transposed here to C. Optional low bass tones in keyboard part are given in small notes.

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • 3rd Mvmt.

    Originally in g minor, transposed here to c. This arrangement has a precedent of sorts by Bach himself, in that Sonata No. 1 for Gamba, BWV 1027 seems to have originated as BWV 1039, a trio sonata for two flutes. Thus, the convertibility of music in different octaves and for different timbres (as well the number of instruments deployed) is clearly established in the repertory, even without reference to all the firm evidence we have about Baroque performance practice. In the first movement, some of the hardest passages for the recorder part are eliminated, or rather given to the keyboard player, simply by switching places between the original gamba part and the right hand of the keyboard part. Of course, the fact that these two parts are in the same style (very much as in a trio sonata, or a double concerto) is what makes this an especially viable transcriptional option. Note the alternative version in d; this one in c is a little bit more difficult. Film buffs take note that the slow movement of this sonata is featured prominently in the opening section of the 1991 movie “Truly, Madly, Deeply.”

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • Radetzky March, for alto—doubling C instrument—and bass recorders

    Originally in D major, transposed here to C. There is a shift to C instrument between the march and the trio. This is the show-stopping New Year’s Eve in Vienna warhorse, preferably including audience clapping during the main theme.

    2 pp.
    $0.50
  • Haydn100.3Duet

    2 pp.
    $0.50
  • Prelude

    Originally in C# major, transposed here to F.

    Recorder & Keyboard part, 2 pp.
    $2.00
  • Both 2. Allemande and 3. Corrente

    Originally in a minor, transposed here to d. Includes an introductory commentary.

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • Fugue

    Originally for lute, for keyboard, or for both, or possibly for lute-harpsichord, in c minor, transposed here to d. The prelude is supplied with optional cadenzas at the two fermatas toward the end. It is possible to perform the last two dances in the order presented, or, as in the great recorded performance by guitarist Julian Bream, play the A section of the Double right after the A section of the Gigue, followed by the respective B sections. Slight revision May 6, 2014. Significant revision of Double Jan. 18, 2016, in which the keyboard now extends over the usual limit of C6 to E6.

    Recorder part, 2 pp.
    $0.50
  • Gymnopédie No. 2

    There is no separate recorder part, since both players can usually read from the same score. (If this is unworkable, another score must be printed out.) Originally for piano solo. This arrangement at original pitch. The 1st and 3rd Gymnop?dies call for tenor recorder, the 2nd for alto. Since the guitar part of the 2nd is more difficult than the others, Nos. 1 and 3 may be performed alone, or rather perhaps in the order of the famous Debussy arrangement for orchestra, 3 followed by 1.

    2 pp.
    $0.50
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